Free Salad – Summer eNews!

There are SO many great herbs and plants growing right now to add to your meals and start harvesting for winter! Many are growing right in your own yards and gardens and you may be pulling them out as “weeds” and tossing out amazing bundles of nutrition and flavor!

In this newsletter there are a few common herbs that are packed with nutrition, flavor and are easy to find and identify. Enjoy!

Remember to check the calendar on the website for upcoming classes and events!

GREAT BOOKS TO HELP YOU IDENTIFY HERBS GROWING AROUND YOU ____________________________

BOTANY IN A DAY – THOMAS J.ELPEL

NECOMB’S WILDFLOWER GUIDE- LAWRENCE NEWCOMB

FORAGER’S HARVEST-SAM THAYER

NATURE’S GARDEN-SAM THAYER

MIDWEST FORAGING- LISA M. ROSE

MIDWEST MEDICINAL PLANTS – LISA M. ROSE

WHAT’S DOIN’ THE BLOOMIN’? -CLAYTON AND MICHELE OSLUND

Before you start harvesting….

There are many ways that plants can be used to help us with our wellness.

Wild and cultivated herbs have specific properties that help our well being, physically, emotionally, mentally and spiritually.

When you are working with plants it is very important to remember that they are alive.

Each plant has an essence, a spirit, a purpose.

We were put on this earth to live together and help each other.

Plants are very willing to help. They give their very lives to sustain and nurture us.

When you are gathering or harvesting any member of the plant kingdom, please remember to honor their contribution to your life.

Take the time to connect with the greater spirit and energy that is in all of us and all things.

Ask if it is OK to be taking this being and using it for your purpose.

Be grateful for the gift.

Be careful and respectful of your harvest techniques. Gather only what is needed.

Give something in return. Offer tobacco, a prayer, a song, some people will leave a bit of their own hair. Do what feels comfortable and respectful to you, but do something.

*Learn as much as you can about your plants allies before you use them. Use at least 3 sources of reference and pictures to make sure you know you have correctly identified what you have found.

*Make sure of the “cleanliness” of the places you are picking – do people walk their dogs there… is it far enough from the road- 25 to 50 feet ….was there something built there before that could have been toxic to the earth? Certain plants grow in places where the ground/water is needing help to clean itself. Like Lambs’ Quarters, Amaranth, Cattails, Ground Ivy/Creeping Charlie.

*The very same plants grow in other areas that are safe and clean so they are clean to eat – knowing the difference in “how” they grow for that situation can be of benefit. This is where communicating and asking if it is OK for you to pick them is very important. The plants will tell you- no.

*Using plants as a food/nutrition source vs “medicine” are not completely different processes, rather they are just two different spots on the continuum of integrating plants into your life.

Bevin Claire notes the spectrum goes all the way to “poison” , however many plants that people know to be “toxic” when used by a knowledgeable practitioner in the proper dose/way can have huge healing effects.

But there is a whole lot of leeway and ground to cover before you get to that point. Think of making whole salad out of Echinacea leaves or yarrow leaves – not too tasty…. But a few leaves in a cup of tea- that’s different, not really a “food/tonic” , definitely more of a medicine, but pretty safe to use and try and not on the “toxic” end of the scale.

Use your tools to ID your herbs and get out there and have fun!

Amaranth – Amaranthus spp.

Nearly 40 species. All are edible. Seed head and general growth/shape of plant has similar appearance – but – leaves are different shape. They are in the same family of plants as beets and spinaches.

Generally, a “hot weather plant” it does not really get growing until mid/late summer.

You can eat the entire young plant until the stems start to get tough. Steaming them lightly makes the more mature stems palatable and soft. Once the plant starts to go to seed the stems become woody. At this point you can still pick the individual leaves and eat them. I harvest leaves well into the early winter, when I can still get to them.

When I first learned about Amaranth I tried (only one time!) to harvest enough seeds to make a loaf of bread! My personal experiment was not that successful as the seeds are very small. Now, each season, I collect with the focus of gathering the seeds to use as additions to cereals and things like that.

An easy way to collect the seeds is put the cut plant top, seed side down (upside down) in a paper bag. Every couple days, shake it around and make sure air is moving thru the plant, as the seeds dry they drop off into the bottom of the bag.

Dried or frozen leaves can be added to soups and other cooked dishes. Leaves can be frozen along with other greens to add to green smoothies in the winter.

If storage space is an issue and you have the time, drying the leaves and then powdering them using a food processor is a great way to get a lot of green nutrition packed into a small space.

Amaranth leaves are nutritionally similar to beets, Swiss chard and spinach, but are much superior. For example, amaranth leaves contain three times more calcium and three times more niacin (vitamin B3) than spinach leaves. The leaves are an excellent source of carotene, iron, calcium, protein, vitamin C, magnesium and of the amino acid Lysine.

Purslane- Portulaca oleracea

Purslane leaves appear thick and are mucilaginous. Leaves and tender stems have a slightly sour, and salty taste. In addition to succulent stems and leaves, its yellow flower buds are also edible. Purslane is somewhat crunchy and has a slight lemony taste. I think it tastes kind of like a cucumber. Some people liken it to watercress or spinach, and it can substitute for spinach in many recipes. Young, raw leaves and stems are tender and are good in salads and sandwiches. They can also be lightly steamed or stir-fried. Purslane’s high level of pectin (known to lower cholesterol) thickens soups, stews and green smoothies. It makes a great pesto. Purslane seeds, appear like black tea powder, are often used to make some herbal drinks .Fresh leaves contain surprisingly more omega-3 fatty acids (α-linolenic acid) than any other leafy vegetable plant. 100 grams of fresh purslane leaves provide about 350 mg of α-linolenic acid. Research studies show that consumption of foods rich in ω-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and help prevent the development of ADHD, autism, and other developmental differences in children.

Purslane contains two types of potent anti-oxidants and have been found to have anti-mutagenic properties in laboratory studies. [Proc. West. Pharmacol. Soc. 45: 101-103 (2002)] Purslane may be a common plant, but it is uncommonly good for you and is one of the richest known plant sources of ALA – an essential omega-3 fatty acid called alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Omega-3s are a class of polyunsaturated essential fatty acids. Your body cannot manufacture essential fatty acids, so you must get them from food. The typical American diet contains too few omega-3s, a shortage that is linked to a barrage of illnesses including heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease Purslane it is rich in dietary fiber, vitamins, and minerals it provides six times more vitamin E than spinach and seven times more beta carotene than carrots. It’s also rich in vitamin C, magnesium, riboflavin, potassium and phosphorus

   

Common Lambs quarters -Chenopodium album

is a rapidly growing summer annual weed. Height averages 3 feet (90 cm), but may vary from a few inches to 6 feet (1.8 m). The extremely variable growth behavior of lambs quarters enables the plant to adapt to almost any environmental condition. Lamb’s quarter thrives as a common weed in gardens, near streams, rivers, forest clearings, waste places and pretty much anywhere. It is very hardy and grows in many areas throughout the U.S. and Canada .

Lambs Quarters is an annual wild edible that from a distance tends to always looks dusty; this is because there is a white powdery coating on the leaves. Lambs Quarters is a purifying plant and helps to restore healthy nutrients to the soil if need be. However, if there is a large patch of lamb’s quarters, be sure that the soil is relatively good and not contaminated. This unique plant tends to spread quickly in areas in which soil is contaminated in order to restore nutrients. This wild edible has an earthy, mineral rich taste; some say is close to chard. If you enjoy leafy greens such as kale, collards, and spinach then chances are you will like lambs quarter. One lamb’s quarter plant can produce up to 75,000 seeds. It produces tiny green flowers that form in clusters on top of spikes, and the leaves resemble the shape of a goosefoot. Leaves vary in shape from triangular to ovate to lanceolate. Lower leaves may have a goosefoot shape, while upper ones are linear. Mature plants are pyramidal, have many branches, and are crowded with clustered spikes of dull green flowers. Flower clusters are located at the ends of stems and branches or in the crooks (axils) of the upper leaves. Flowers are small, mealy, and green. Edible parts: Leaves, shoots, seeds, flowers. Saponins in the seeds are potentially toxic and should not be consumed in excess. Lamb’s quarters contain some oxalic acid therefore when eating this raw, small quantities are recommended. Cooking removes this acid. Lamb’s quarter can be eaten in salads or added to smoothies and juices. Steaming this edible weed is one method of cooking, or can be added to soups, sautés and much more. Drying this wild edible is one way to add this nutritious plant to your meals throughout the winter or you can blanch and freeze the leaves.

Nutritional info

Lambs quarter Seeds

Protein 19.6 grams

Fat 4.2 grams

Carbos 57.7 grams Fiber 27.1 grams

Calcium 1036 mg

Potassium 1687 mg

Niacin 3800 mg

Iron 64 mg

Nutritional info

Lambs quarter Shoots

Protein 3.5 g

Carbos 5.5 g

Calcium 324 mg

Potassium 684 mg

Beta Carotene 3800 ug

Niacin 1000 ug

Iron 1.5 mg

   

Spring 2019 Upcoming Events and News

Happy Spring! May the season around you bring vitalizing energy of new growth and and co creation to you!

I had the opportunity to speak at the MN Hospice and Palliative annual conference this past week. Its a 3 day event with hundreds of registrants. I was only there for the day I was speaking. It was such a thought provoking and uplifting day. The keynote speaker was amazing here is his bio from the conf. and some thoughts that he shared. I am definitely going to get his book!

Frank Ostazeski is an internationally respected Buddhist teacher and pioneer in end of life care. He is the visionary co-founder of the Zen Hospice Project, and founder of the Metta Institute. He has companioned thousands on the precipice of death, trained countless clinicians and caregivers and synthesized 30 years of being with dying into his personal brand of wisdom. He has lectured at Harvard Medical School, the Mayo Clinic, leading corporations like Google and teaches at major spiritual centers around the globe. Frank is the 2018 recipient of the prestigious Humanities Award from the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine.

His groundbreaking work has been featured on the Bill Moyers PBS series On Our Own Terms, highlighted on The Oprah Winfrey Show, and honored by H.H. the Dalai Lama. He is the author of The Five Invitations: Discovering What Death Can Teach Us About Living Fully.

Among the other things he shared during his talk he invited us to use these four questions at the end of our day to help with mindful presence in the world:

What inspired you today?
What challenged you today?
What surprised you today?
What did you learn about love today?

The overarching question related to these 4 is what do you notice about your feelings and what is your relationship to these feelings?

It is a great way to think about your day for yourself and have conversation with others.


Come join me for this fun event ! Lots of great speakers, vendors and more!

Spirit & Wellness Connection

May 18th at the Radisson Hotel Duluth

more details available at spiritwellnessconnection.com

I will be presenting a class on spring foraging!​

“FREE SALAD! And More…”Discover wild herbs and plants packed with nutrition, that nature grows for you! Learn how to identify and use the herbs growing in your back yard and in nearby woods. Become familiar with wild plants (weeds!) and herbs to easily add to your meals for unique and interesting flavors and added nutrition. Stacey will explain each herbs nutritional benefits and which can be use for herbal first aid.


Only TWO MONTHS AWAY! Registration is open now- reserve your spot today!

HERBAL TIPS AND PEARLS OF WISDOM READING THE BODY, CLINICAL SKILLS AND MORE.

Margi Flint June 22 – 23 Duluth MN 10 – 4 $250

For more information, see the Event Listing on my page here.


I had the opportunity to meet an inspired uplifter at the healing touch regional conf this March. Her name is Jacquelyn Fletcher and she is an outstanding author and speaker. Her very special books and cards really called to me, I got three of them and some cards and would have gotten more if budget would have been different at the time. They are inspirational for self and for others. And – since I want to share access to them with everyone! She gave me a special link to her etsy site and a code for a discount just for you!

Click here for her Jacqueline’s Etsy Shop (and coupon)!


Save the Date and Early registration opportunities!

Sept 6-8,2019 -Great Lakes Herb Faire Registration is filling fast! Sign up now the speakers are amazing and the fun is non stop! https://www.greatlakesherbfaire.org/2019-registration.html

October 5-6,2019 Healing Touch Course 1, Foundations in Healing Touch- Duluth MN. Contact Stacey to register- forms available on website

October 25-27, 2019 Healing Touch Course 3, Advanced Practitioner Skills – Duluth MN. Contact Stacey to register- forms available on website

Winter warm ups, Immune Support Recipes, and things to do

The winter cold has showed up for people in a variety of upper respiratory concerns.Dry heated indoors and cold dry outdoor air impact the mucus membrane of our respiratory tract which can allow different kinds of virus and bacteria easier access to set up housekeeping.

Over the past couple of weeks I have had people call me for herbs to help moisten and support the tissues for helping with symptoms of bronchitis, colds or sinus troubles.Several times it has been that the person is unable to get the herbs that day.

Thyme has bridged the gap and started the re balancing process in a very quick and clear way.

Keeping Thyme in your kitchen cupboard and using it proactively when those around you are getting sick or you start to feel a like you have a cold coming on, is one of the best first aid herbal remedies you can do for yourself.

Thyme (Thymus vulgaris)– contains a volatile oil called thymol, and some other constituents that help us with many conditions, including:

  • Anti-microbial anti – fungal, antioxidant.
  • Prevents and lessens upper respiratory infections, colds.
  • Used topically for infections and wound healing, and skin disorders.
  • Tea can help with Colic, upset stomach, stomach pain (gastritis intestinal gas (flatulence), parasitic worm infections .
  • Mildly diuretic- the volatile oils can help with urinary tract infections.
  • Appetite stimulant.
  • Relaxing to tissues and the nervous system

Make an infusion (tea): _ — 2 Tbsp of dried herb to 1 Qt of water,

–steep for 5 to 15 minutes and drink it throughout the day. –Drinking it as strong as you can gets the action to your mucus membranes and immune system quickly. — –However a lighter infusion works well and is safe for kids.

–sweeten with honey if needed.

Aromatic steam – Thyme is only one of the anti-microbial herbs – Sage, Mint, or Rosemary can also be very effective as a steam inhalant and/or properly diluted essential oils could also be used in this way.

  • Fill a large pot ½ to ¾ full of water and bring to near boil.
  • Add a small handful of herbs in the last few moments and keep the pot covered
  • Very carefully place pot so that you can sit close to it -sit on a chair and place it on another chair, stool or low table in front of you
  • Using a sheet or a blanket, drape over your head/body to contain yourself and the pot.
  • Carefully remove the lid- keep your face away from the pot, until this first batch of heat comes out.
  • Sit and breathe deeply for as long as you can tolerate. Let the steam permeate you. Sweat, if you are able.
  • Another method is to make a large strong batch of the infusion and pour it into your bathwater, close the curtain and let the herbs soak into your skin as well as breathe them in.

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Keep your immune system supported with these two daily practices

OIL PULLING –

This oral therapy is a type of Ayurvedic medicine -a traditional Indian system- that dates back 3,000 years. It involves swishing approximately 1 tablespoon of oil — typically coconut, sesame, or sunflower oil — in your mouth for about 20 minutes and then spitting it out. Using coconut oil has extra benefit. While you can get the same bacteria-fighting benefits with sesame or sunflower oil, coconut oil has the added benefit of lauric acid, which is well-known for its anti-microbial agents.

Start with just 5 minutes a day. Twenty minutes of swishing is a long time, and while the longer you pull, the more bacteria you’ll remove, 5 or 10 minutes will still offer some benefit. Also, if your jaw starts aching a few minutes in, slow down. Don’t work too hard .A gentle swishing, pushing, and sucking the oil through the teeth is all that’s required.

Spit it out in the garbage, not down the drain, especially coconut oil.

Most microorganisms inhabiting the mouth consist of a single cell .Cells are covered with a lipid, or fatty, membrane, which is the cell’s skin. When these cells come into contact with oil, a fat, they naturally adhere to each other.

Recent studies show that oil pulling helps against gingivitis, plaque, and microorganisms that cause bad breath.

Other reported benefits are Whiter teeth, stronger teeth and gums, Less jaw pain (TMJ sufferers noted great improvement), decreased sleep problems and sinus issues, alleviation of headaches, hangovers and skin issues (reports have shown improvement in acne, psoriasis and eczema)

After beginning oil pulling you may notice some detoxing effects such as sinuses draining. Some people have reported headache symptoms similar to a caffeine withdrawal.

DRY BRUSHING –

  • The skin is the largest most important eliminative organ in the body and is responsible for one quarter of the body’s detoxification each day.
  • eliminates over one pound of waste acids each day in the average adult, most of it through the sweat glands
  • is known also as our third kidney
  • The skin receives one third of all the blood circulated in the body
  • The skin is the last to receive nutrients in the body, yet the first to show signs of imbalance or deficiency

Detoxification is performed by a number of organs, glands, and transportation systems, including the skin, gut, kidneys, liver, lungs, lymphatic system, and mucous membranes. Dry brushing is a way to stimulate all the above organs of detoxification because it provides a gentle internal massage.

Dry brushing cleans the lymphatic system. The Lymph System is considered part of our immune system and is made of white blood cells called lymphocytes and the interstitial fluid that bathe our cells, bringing our cells nutrients and removing their waste. All detoxification occurs first and foremost through the lymph. Our bodies contain far more lymph than blood,Our lymphatic system is a dependent system it is impacted by gravity and movement. Dry brushing helps move the lymph containing large proteins and particulate matter that cannot be transported in any other way back into circulatory system. If these proteins stayed in our systems outside the blood vessels, it would attract other fluid. This can result in swollen ankles, limbs, skin issues and cellulite.

Dry brushing stimulates the hormone and oil glands, thus helping all of the body systems perform at peak efficiency. The skin is your body’s largest organ. When improperly maintained, the elimination duties of the skin are forced upon the kidneys. Chemical analysis of sweat shows that it has almost the same constituents as urine. If the skin becomes inactive, its pores choke with millions of dead cells, uric acid and other impurities which will remain in the body putting extra stress on the liver and kidneys.

Dry brushing strengthens the immune system. Dry skin brushing may reduce duration of infection and accelerate the clearing of toxins. It helps support the immune system during cancer and other chronic illness treatment. By stimulating the lymph vessels to drain toxic mucoid matter into organs of detoxification we can purify the entire system. After several days of dry brushing, sometimes you may notice a gelatinous mucoid material in your stools. This is a normal sign that the intestinal tract is renewing itself.

Dry Brushing: How to Do It

  • First you’ll need a high-quality dry brush. Look for one with bristles made from natural materials. They should feel stiff but not overly so. Ideally, choose a brush with a long handle so you can reach your entire back and other hard-to-reach spots.
  • Dry skin brushing should be done daily for best results, or even twice a day if you like. Try incorporating it into your normal daily routine, such as doing your brushing before your morning shower and then again after work (avoid doing it too close to bedtime, as it may leave you feeling energized).
  • When brushing, Use long sweeping strokes. Always brush toward your heart, which is best for circulation and your lymphatic system. You can brush your entire body (including the soles of your feet). Start at your feet and work your way up your legs to your arms, chest, back, and stomach.
  • Avoid brushing your face (unless you have a special brush designed for this delicate skin), your genitals, or any areas with irritations or abrasions (including varicose veins).
  • The pressure you apply while brushing your skin should be firm but not painful (avoid “scrubbing”). Your skin should be pink after a session (not red or irritated) and you can brush for as long (or as little) as you’d like. An average dry brushing session may last between two and 20 minutes.

Winter boots and walking like a penguin making your feet hurt?

When we are walking in rigid boots and altering our stepping to walk safely, we are often also holding our bodies tighter for balance and as a response to the cold

Here are some tips and reminders from Joseph ! Common patterns are:

Muscle weakness

Muscle strain/tension

Altered bio-mechanics

Ligamentous/fascial strain

Three most important words: Strength, Stretch, and Stability.

Strength provides you the ability to move your body part though the entire range that is currently available.Stretching provides flexibility in the joints and muscles that are going to be moved.Stability is the harmony in the part, joints, and muscles that produce the movement.

Particular stretching reminders for your feet include:

  • Doing foot crunches, ankle inversions,
  • Calf stretches –knee straight/bent.
  • Stretch shin and top of foot,
  • Spread your toes- see if you can get your fingers laced between your toes- gently stretch in alignment. ( I do this one every night, and sometimes in the morning too- It feels great! I also put my pine and cedar soother on my feet while I am doing it http://www.energyforlifeconnection.com/skin-soothers/– ahhhh, another great winter warm up! )

If you want more detail or help with learning specific stretches and strengthening for your feet (or any part of your body!) you can text/call him at 218.341.1205

HEALING TOUCH 2019 CLASSES

*Still time to register for the February 23-24th, 2019 Course 1 Duluth

April 27,28,2019 Course 2 Duluth

Oct 25,26,27,2019 Course 3 Duluth

View my Calendar to see each class event and to download registration forms

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SAVE THE DATE!

Herbal Tips and Pearls of Wisdom Reading the Body, clinical skills and more. Margi Flint returns to Duluth June 22-23, 2019 ! Awesome fill for your wintertime daydreaming! Plan now for attending her Amazing class!

Reading the Body Each color, line and marking on the face, tongue and nails holds meaning of your internal health. Margi will be explaining and demonstrating diagnostic techniques taught to her by the late William Le Sassier. Knowing what the body has to say, we can learn how to prevent illness. Our seminar will consist of both lecture and hands on learning with ample opportunity for questions to understand what your body is saying to you. Please arrive makeup and nail polish free Practitioner Skills Learning the skills of a healthy client/practitioner relationship is an essential part of creating a dynamic clinical practice. In this one-day workshop, Margi Flint shares her insights for working with clients, gleaned from her 40+ years of private practice as an herbalist, labor coach and polarity therapist.

Herbal Tips and Pearls of Wisdom Reading the Body, clinical skills and more.

November 2018 News

Showing up in gratitude and healing presence

In this season of Thanks and renewal may you all find ways to be present in the best version of yourselves. It can be a time of true exercise in staying in our Truth, and shining our Light and showing up from our Heart centers.

Here are some words that I have posted in a couple of places to help me remember on a daily basis, how I want to be :

BEFORE you speak THINK

T= Is it TRUE?

H= Is it HELPFUL?

I= Is it INSPIRING?

N= Is it NECESSARY?

K= Is it KIND?


These words are from my healing touch friend and colleague Dr. Deborah R. Goldberg, an amazing teacher, writer and therapist.

In This Place in time

I vow to stay present to my experience.

In this place in time

I vow to build relationships and mend ones.

In this place in time

I vow to follow my heart and take action from a place of love.

In this place in time

I vow to honor my feelings through self- acknowledgement and validation.

I realize it is the only way to fully heal.

In this place in time

I vow to realize my potential and make it so to the best of my ability

In this place in time

I vow to recognize that I have a purpose and I surrender to that purpose willingly

In this place in time

I vow to see the light in every situation through my light within

In this place in time

I vow to be of service to the greater good for the betterment of the whole

In this place in time I choose to BE Heaven on Earth

Dr. Deborah R. Goldberg 612-61 9-5990

Deb_ goldberg 2005 @yahoo.com

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GET IT LOCAL! Support your local businesses and craftspeople and get great gifts for yourself and others- Come stock up on winter wellness herbal supplies from Stacey, and get a chair massage from Joseph

ultra-local gift fair

Peace Church

1111 N. 11th Ave E., Duluth

Dec 1

10AM—3PM

more than 30 Duluth & Superior artists and organizations

LOCAL CLASSES in COMMUNITY

December classes still have space at the Whole Foods Co op in Duluth and at the Virginia Natural Harvest. Check the website for class schedules at both locations and sign up with the co ops if you see one that interests you! http://www.energyforlifeconnection.com/classes-and-events/

Dec 11th -Do your Feet Hurt?

Dec 13th- Help me Sleep!

Dec 22nd -Food allergies and sensitivities

Jan 15th -Ph and Inflammation

HEALING TOUCH 2019 CLASSES

February 23-24th, 2019 Course 1 Duluth

April 27,28,2019 Course 2 Duluth

Oct 25,26,27,2019 Course 3 Duluth

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SAVE THE DATE!

Herbal Tips and Pearls of Wisdom Reading the Body, clinical skills and more. Margi Flint returns to Duluth June 22-23, 2019 ! Awesome fill for your wintertime daydreaming! Plan now for attending her Amazing class!

Reading the Body Each color, line and marking on the face, tongue and nails holds meaning of your internal health. Margi will be explaining and demonstrating diagnostic techniques taught to her by the late William Le Sassier. Knowing what the body has to say, we can learn how to prevent illness. Our seminar will consist of both lecture and hands on learning with ample opportunity for questions to understand what your body is saying to you. Please arrive makeup and nail polish free Practitioner Skills Learning the skills of a healthy client/practitioner relationship is an essential part of creating a dynamic clinical practice. In this one-day workshop, Margi Flint shares her insights for working with clients, gleaned from her 40+ years of private practice as an herbalist, labor coach and polarity therapist.

Herbal Tips and Pearls of Wisdom Reading the Body, clinical skills and more.

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ON LINE with ENERGY FOR LIFE CONNECTION

Here are the links pod casts I did this summer/fall- you can also access them on the website classes and events page.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/cutvnewsradio/2018/09/19/cutv-news-radio-to-spotlight-stacey-quade-of-energy-for-life-connection

Episode 44 – Interview with Stacey Quade – Herbalist and Healing Touch Practitioner

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HOLISTIC WELLNESS GET AWAY

We had our first weekend client and it was really fun and rewarding! A great idea for a self care shift after the busy holiday season- book your times soon!

Energy for Life Connection in Duluth Minnesota – The perfect place to Plan your holistic wellness getaway! http://www.energyforlifeconnection.com/visit-duluth/

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Its that time of year again! Here is the basic recipe for turmeric milk – a great make ahead easy way to make this for yourself or give it for a sweet holiday present is, to get dry coconut milk and mix it with the dry spices- stored in a jar, all you need to do is add hot water the sweetener and vanilla to your individual cup- it works great! I’ve thought about adding dark cocoa to the powder mix, but have not tried it yet! Someone let me know if you do!

Turmeric milk -rich, creamy and satisfying a soothing evening treat or a warming alternative for that mid- day coffee or tea. Adding black pepper to the mixture will greatly increase the absorption of turmeric into the body. It also gives the drink a spicy kick.

For one serving you will need:

one cup milk (vegan milks work great!)

1/4-1/2 teaspoon turmeric

3/4- 1 teaspoon sweetener of your choice

1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom (or a few cardamom pods)

pinch of powdered ginger or small piece of peeled ginger root

dash of vanilla extract

dash of black pepper or black peppercorns

pinch of cloves (if desired)

pinch of allspice (if desired)

sieve/strainer

1) Heat the milk on the stove. When milk becomes warm, add turmeric powder. Stir slowly to dissolve any lumps.

The liquid will take on a rich, mustard color.

2) Add the honey, ginger root, vanilla and spices.

3) Keep the pot on gentle heat for a few minutes

4) Pour the milk through a fine sieve to remove the ginger root, cardamom and pepper. (The turmeric can be a bit grainy, too.)

5) Enjoy!

All ingredients can be adjusted for individual tastes!

Autumn 2018 Updates

The change of season came quickly this year! Its been interesting to get the fall harvest gathered in between the raindrops! Nearly done digging roots for winter wellness and gathering the last bundles of herbs along with the garden annuals. I hope this note finds you feeling well and settling in to the changes with ease.

I attended the Healing Beyond Borders international conference for a week in early September. It was amazing. I completed the first phase of my training for teaching Course two workshops and attended many speaker sessions that expanded my skills and tools to be able to serve my clients more fully. New applications of techniques for assisting with trauma release,integrating past and present,and visioning for the future. I am excited to have these new options and have been using them as part of my own self care routine.
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This poem resonated with me and the transitions I am experiencing in my own life right now.

Autumn Leaves

Golden, crisp leaves falling softly from almost bare trees,

Lifting and falling in a hushed gentle breeze.

Slowly dropping to the soft cushioned ground,

Whispering and rustling a soothing sound.

Coppers, golds, and rusted tones,

Mother Nature’s way of letting go.

They fall and gather one by one,

Autumn is here, summer has gone.

Crunching as I walk through their warm, fiery glow,

Nature’s carpet rich and pure that again shall grow.

To protect and shield its majestic tree,

Standing tall and strong for the world to see.

They rise and fall in the cool, crisp air.

It’s a time of change in this world we share,

Nature’s importance reflecting our own lives,

Letting go of our fears and again, too, we shall thrive .

© Edel T. Copeland Published: November 2016

Source: https://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/autumn-leaves-5

As we let go of patterns, habits and ways of thinking it creates space for new growth opportunities- here are some of the fun things that were co created in this expansion!

ONLINE with ENERGY FOR LIFE CONNECTION

I had two opportunities this season to share about herbalism and energy based therapy along with the services we provide at Energy for Life connection.It is big step for me in expanding my social media skills and on line presence. It was a little scary and a lot of fun! I hope you enjoy listening!.

Here are the links to the podcasts- you can also access them on the website classes and events page.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/cutvnewsradio/2018/09/19/cutv-news-radio-to-spotlight-stacey-quade-of-energy-for-life-connection

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LOCAL CLASSES in COMMUNITY

Stacey and Joseph will be teaching at the Whole Foods Co op in Duluth and at the Virginia Natural Harvest. Check the website for class schedules at both locations and sign up with the co ops if you see one that interests you!

HEALING TOUCH – November 3-4, 2018 HIBBING, MN. Still has room for registrants. Registration brochure available on the website

http://www.energyforlifeconnection.com/wp-content/uploads/Brochure-Foundations-of-Healing-Touch-Hibbing.pdf

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HOLISTIC WELLNESS GETAWAY

For years Joseph and I have talked about how to help people put into practice the information and lifestyle changes that we share with them. We all have tools in our tool boxes that we don’t readily use because its hard to figure out how to shift our habits and make room. As a result of the CUTV interview I finally organized our ideas into a service package. You don’t have to be from out of town to get in on this deal!

Energy for Life Connection in Duluth Minnesota – The perfect place to Plan your holistic wellness getaway!
http://www.energyforlifeconnection.com/visit-duluth/

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HERBAL COLLABORATIONS

The Arrowhead Region Herbal Guild had our debut presence at the 2018 fall Harvest Festival at Bayfront park. This group consists of a number of clinical herbalists with a vision to create more community access and education to herbs and our herbal services. In the coming year expect to see us in the Duluth area offering herbal classes and consultations — more to come!

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another exciting collaboration came along as part of this new herbal group

Melissa Borer and Stacey Quade collaborating -Melissa and I are offering an energy based therapy and herbal service package to offer the skills of two practitioners to help you with your wellness goals.

SAVE THE DATE!

Herbal Tips and Pearls of Wisdom Reading the Body, clinical skills and more. Margi Flint returns to Duluth June 22-23, 2019 ! Awesome fill for your wintertime daydreaming! Plan now for attending her Amazing class!

GRATITUDES – Thank you to my amazing web designer Scott Schumacher for helping with all the new additions to my website and making it look so good!
http://www.holisticgeek.com/